Arthlopleura diet?

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Arthlopleura diet?

Postby Andrewsaurchus101 » Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:01 pm

Will arthlopleura be a herbivore? I've heard theories saying that this may not be the case.
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Re: Arthlopleura diet?

Postby ProjectMammoth » Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:26 pm

plants, plants, plants, plants, plants..... and the occasional protein rich items......
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Re: Arthlopleura diet?

Postby Andrewsaurchus101 » Mon Aug 22, 2016 10:48 am

ProjectMammoth wrote:plants, plants, plants, plants, plants..... and the occasional protein rich items......


makes sense, I just heard some stuff that said it may have been omnivorous or even carnivorous.

Omnivore makes the most sense to me!
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Re: Arthlopleura diet?

Postby ProjectMammoth » Mon Aug 22, 2016 11:45 am

An omnivorous diet makes the most sense.
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Re: Arthlopleura diet?

Postby velocichap » Mon Aug 22, 2016 12:00 pm

Andrewsaurchus101 wrote:
ProjectMammoth wrote:plants, plants, plants, plants, plants..... and the occasional protein rich items......


makes sense, I just heard some stuff that said it may have been omnivorous or even carnivorous.

Omnivore makes the most sense to me!

...carnivorous you say... have you been watching too much primeval 8-)
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Re: Arthlopleura diet?

Postby Andrewsaurchus101 » Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:20 pm

velocichap wrote:
Andrewsaurchus101 wrote:
ProjectMammoth wrote:plants, plants, plants, plants, plants..... and the occasional protein rich items......


makes sense, I just heard some stuff that said it may have been omnivorous or even carnivorous.

Omnivore makes the most sense to me!

...carnivorous you say... have you been watching too much primeval 8-)


i was referring to this

"A herbivorous diet of Arthropleura seemed to be demonstrated by the description of gut contents by Rolfe and Ingham (1967). Kraus (2005, p. 18-20) has reinvestigated this specimen with the result that “the wooden parts were accidentally fossilized together with the Arthropleura specimen and do not constitute any gut content.” However, assuming that Arthropleura was a penicillate diplodod, Kraus (2005, p. 20) concluded in a perfectly circular argument that Arthropleura was herbivorous, as are (nearly) all diplopods. The gigantism of arthropleurids should therefore be “an evolutionary answer to the availability of an unusually plentiful food niche: masses of spores and pteridosperm pollen, perhaps also prothallia.” However, feeding on spores and pollen appears unlikely for an animal of this size, even if they are concentrated in lacustrine deposits such as cannel coals. If Arthropleura had used this nutrient source, lakeshores should have been most frequented by this animal. Again, this is very improbable because Arthropleura remains are completely missing in lake deposits thus far (see Hannibal, 1997, for the supposed occurrence in the lacustrine black shales of Linton, Ohio). Alternatively, fructifications, megasporophylls and cm-size seeds (ovules) such as Cardiocarpus and Trigonocarpus could have been an energy-rich food for large arthropods. The question is whether or not this food source was available year-round. The production of fructifications and seeds could have been very seasonal as the climate became increasingly seasonal after the late Westphalian (Late Moscovian). Sporadic mass occurrences of gymnosperm seeds such as Samaropsis and Cardiocarpus in distinct layers (as in the Manebach Arthropleura locality – see Barthel, 2001; here Fig. 5C), are interpreted here as the result of seasonal seed production and taphonomic effects (washed together). Assumed carnivory and interpretation of Arthropleura as a chilopod in Barthel and Schneider (1997) is simply an incorrect citation by Kraus (2005, p. 20). Barthel and Schneider (1997, p. 198) solely compared functionally the construction of the ventral side of Arthropleura with chilopods but did not do so in terms of any phylogenetic relationship. Nevertheless, it could not be excluded that Arthropleura was predatory and could overcome tetrapods as large as itself, as is the case with modern predatory chilopods such as Scolopendra. It can be speculated only that amphibians such as the eryopids, which lived in the same environment, could have easily been preyed upon by this giant arthropod. However, the problem of diet remains open as long as mouthparts or true gut contents of Arthropleura have not been found."

-Schneider et al., 2010
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Re: Arthlopleura diet?

Postby ProjectMammoth » Fri Aug 26, 2016 4:54 pm

And until we find the preserved stomach contents or mouth, it's ambiguous.
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